Paddleboarders Protest Throw-Away Plastic Culture. Ten Ways to Reduce Plastic Use

SURFRIDER Foundation Plastic Protest They crossed the Gulf Stream on SUPs. They paddled, ate, drank and paddled more, said 58-year-old Bill Whiddon* when landing just north of Miami Beach after a 60-mile plus SUP journey from Bimini, a deep-water expedition that took 17 hours, a lot of courage and a great deal of upper body strength.

Paddleboarders Protest Throw-Away Plastic Culture. Ten Ways to Reduce Plastic Use

They crossed the Gulf Stream on SUPs. They paddled, ate, drank and paddled more, said 58-year-old Bill Whiddon* when landing just north of Miami Beach after a 60-mile plus SUP journey from Bimini, a deep-water expedition that took 17 hours, a lot of courage and a great deal of upper body strength.

Why did Whiddon and paddleboarding partner Thaddeus Foote do it? Are they crazy?

Well, maybe a little crazy, but aside from that their goal was to raise awareness to the Surfrider Foundation “Rise Above Plastics” campaign.

Dangers posed to our oceans through the dumping and pollution of single-use plastics is underestimated, says the Foundation, and those who rely on the ocean for recreation and sustenance need to do something about it.

Plastic bottles and cups, plastic grocery bags, throw-away plastic utensils, juice bags and more are getting caught up in ocean gyres and negatively impacting marine environments. Gyres are circulating currents in five the world’s major oceans where marine debris accumulates at their center. One of the most famous is in the Pacific just north of Hawaii called the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch”- a floating mass of debris comprised largely of plastic trash and human waste.

If you’re interested in getting involved with local Surfrider Chapters in Broward or Palm Beach Counties, click here to find the Chapter website. If you just want to be a part of keeping the oceans free of more ‘plastic soup,’ then review this quick read on “Ten Ways to Rise above Plastics.” We’ll all be happy you did.

TEN WAYS TO REDUCE PLASTIC POLLUTION IN OUR OCEANS

  1. Reuse shopping bags or purchase cloth bags and bring them with you shopping. Recycle water bottles or eliminate entirely by refilling metal or glass reusable bottles.
  2. If you eat take-out often, refuse the plastic utensils. Bring your own utensils and rinse them in the rest room or take home and wash. If you rinse in a public restroom, cleanup after yourself.
  3. Ease up on sandwich bags and juice cartons. Replace with reusables.
  4. Drink coffee? Bring your own to-go mug to the coffee shop or insulated cup for smoothies. This is ideal for reducing the use of lids, plastic and plastic-lined cups.
  5. Digital files only please! Reduce or eliminate the need for plastic CDs, DVDs, and jewel cases.
  6. Whatever plastic you use in life – evaluate your need and avoid purchasing products that rely on single-use throwaway plastic packaging or parts.
  7. If you must use plastic, recycle it. Avoid businesses that don’t participate in recycling programs and STOP using polystyrene foam, because in large part it’s unrecyclable.
  8. Volunteer at a beach cleanups. In fact, the Surfrider Foundation holds cleanups monthly.
  9. Support plastic bag and foam bans along with recycling legislation by voting for the candidates who back it.
  10. Talk to friends, family and complete strangers about the importance of reducing the negative impact plastics have on world oceans.

*Miami Watermen Miami Herald

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SUPthings is dedicated to the sport of Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP) and bringing to market paddleboard accessories that are sensible, essential and easy to use. Visit us at www.supthings.com to view our line of easy-to-install, on-board cargo devices designed to secure PFDs, coolers, snorkel stuff and other gear. No drilling needed!

 

Why did Whiddon and paddleboarding partner Thaddeus Foote do it? Are they crazy?

 

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